Bowhunting Woman of South Africa

Jack Coad and Anne O’Leary teamed up with Numzaan Safari to harvest this beautiful Zebra about 200 kilometers northwest of Johannesburg, South Africa.

  • Adventure, Conservation-Oriented, Sacred Moments
  • Full Accommodations, Meals Included, Max Comfort
  • Professional Hunter Guide is Part of Package
  • Exciting, Relatively Low Cost
Anne O’Leary arrives in Thabazimbi Province in South Africa to unpack her Elite Archery bow to assure shot accuracy.
Anne O’Leary arrives in Thabazimbi Province in South Africa to unpack her Elite Archery bow to assure shot accuracy.

By Forrest Fisher

When Jack Coad and Anne O’Leary made a plan to hunt Africa, they planned the hunt of their lifetime.  They discovered that South Africa offered more than 30 species of animals and that some study of which animals to hunt would be needed.   Among the most common animals to hunt are Plains Game animals such as Impala, Wildebeest, Kudu, Gemsbok, Zebra, Eland and many others.

Hunting in South Africa is exciting, an adventure, it is about understanding nature and conservation.  There are wonders in the natural world of Africa that are breathtaking and extraordinary, these elements help hunters to develop a new perception of all things wild when you hunt in Africa. This is especially true for archery hunters.

It is often about observing wild animals that have the power to feast on you and your guide, face to face, while with archery gear in hand.  Animals such as the Cape Buffalo.

The safety of the hunter and the effectiveness of the hunt can depend on the structure and location of the blind such as this one, where Anne harvested her 900 pound Zebra.
The safety of the hunter and the effectiveness of the hunt can depend on the structure and location of the blind such as this one, where Anne harvested her 900 pound Zebra.

Choosing the right place to hunt and the right guide may appear to be complicated, but after conversation with other hunters that have travelled there, decision making is lessened to a manageable numbers of safari facilities.

Jack and Anne chose to hunt with Numzaan Safaris in Thabazimbi, a village in the Limpopo Province South Africa, located about a 3-1/2 hour drive northwest from Johannesburg.  There are multiple airlines that service this area and your travel from the airport is part of the Safari fee.  Upon arrival they met their “PH” or professional hunter (guide), Brent Van As, who advised their every move for safety and effective hunting of several species.

Hunting with a trained guide and effective gear in South Africa hunting may present an opportunity for the reverence of a perfect shot.

The hunter may accept the challenge to make that shot.  It is a sacred moment.  It is awe-inspiring.  It requires mental focus and an understanding with perceptive sense of the role that the hunter takes when hunting in Africa.  It is a role quite different from the role of hunter nearly anywhere else.  It is a role where indigenous natives applaud your success because you will share with them in your bounty, but also a role unpopular to some in the western world.  The locals keenly understand that you part of natural resource management.  They welcome you.

A prerequisite is that hunter skill in the gear of choice is necessary.  Bow, arrows, broadheads, release, sights, counterbalance, and the aim of the hunter in brief duress for the moment of brief encounter.  Your skill must be dominant.

Jack Coad and Anne O’Leary teamed up with Numzaan Safari to harvest this beautiful Zebra about 200 kilometers northwest of Johannesburg, South Africa.
Jack Coad and Anne O’Leary teamed up with Numzaan Safari to harvest this beautiful Zebra about 200 kilometers northwest of Johannesburg, South Africa.

Your understanding can be reduced to a simple few things:  arrow flight and distance to target.  You must recognize and understand the limits and boundaries of your shooting skills, like hunters everywhere, but many fail to recognize this transitional crossroad for taking a shot.

Bow hunts in Africa with many outfitters are usually a minimum of 10 days in stay and run during the African winter that occurs from July through September.

In Africa, accepting that you have the right gear, have developed adequate skill and you are healthy enough to embrace the excitement of the hunt and potential sharing of the harvest, know that you will have a trained and skilled guide.  A guide that has meandered the African wilderness and networks of animal trails that identify preferred hunting areas.

One look at the night sky to see tens of thousands of stars in the unspoiled air of Africa is enough, all by itself, to wish for a quick return to Africa.

The night sky tells a tale of purified and simple living.  Hunters in Africa form an important arm of required balance to keep poachers in check.  Hunter funding pays for poacher policing, without hunters that pay for this privilege to share in the harvest, the capacity for nature to support wild animal populations would have already been compromised.

Winter temperatures in Africa vary between the low 40’s to about a high of 70 in mid-afternoon, but it is sunny most of the time, so use of sunscreen is common.

Africa needs hunters.  African villagers and wild game species needs hunters.

As you explore this need, you realize there is a renewed sense of community.  You better understand the vulnerable community of African wild animals and the necessary role of hunters.  Hunters in Africa are a precious commodity subject to maltreatment from others without understanding of the rescue mission that they perform.

When you accept the challenge to hunt in Africa, and then after you have gone on the hunt and you return, it is only then that you realize how important it has been for you to form this new kinship with nature and our Creator.  A kinship that is vulnerable to confrontation.

Therefore it is important to realize that hunting in Africa requires moral courage and a new understanding that, in fact, as a hunter in Africa, you are a gift.  You are bound to respect, bound to scientific management of the species you harvest and share, bound to support the costly licensing procedure, bound to the reciprocity of the timeless bond with nature and the wilds that is shared by all hunters who respect their hunting moments as sacred.

To learn more about hunting and what it costs, what you should pack and how far in advance to plan, visit this website: http://www.numzaan.com/.  One thing that is surprising is that you will learn it is far less costly to hunt Africa than it is the Rocky Mountains in western United States or up north in Alaska.  I was surprised at this, but it accentuates the need for hunters to visit Africa.

If you have additional questions, you might email their guide, Brent Van As, directly, at brent@numzaan.com.  

For it is you and I that must understand there is reciprocal balance and you and I are part of that delicate scale.