Compact Outdoor Cookware: Ideal for Backpacking & Camping

  • Durable and innovative line of outdoor cookware
  • Ultimate outdoor eating solution integrated into one package   

By Bob Holzhei

Our four children, my wife and I, have camped throughout our lives. We started first with a 9 by 9 tent, then moved up to a pop-up camper, then a travel trailer, and finally we purchased a fifth wheel travel trailer with four slide outs. Thing is, maximizing space throughout the years was always a priority, after all, there’s no use packing things that may not get used. That is one reason why I wanted to share some of my experience with those of you just getting started. Where space and efficiency is important, products from GSI Outdoors have met the mission.

My compact 4-person outdoor cookware set includes a 3-liter pot, 2-liter pot, a 9-inch frypan and 2 straining lids. The Pinnacle Camper Set also includes four 14-ounce bowls, plates and mugs-complete with sip-it-lids to complete the package.

For my family, it’s our ultimate outdoor eating solution integrated into one package that easily fits into a backpack too. At under 4 pounds and a wonderful 9 by 9 by 6 compact size, the kids can go on side treks and weight and size are not a factor. I could not believe it either.

GSI Outdoors is in the business of making cookware and dining products that adapt the comforts of home to active outdoor lifestyles at the campsite, cabin and anywhere in between.

They continue to expand their designs, adding additional innovative lines of outdoor cookware, tableware and accessories. It works for us outdoor folks that share a passion to be outdoors and have the additional need “to be small and light.”

When well-built hardware brings people together in the outdoors, I thought you’d like to know about some of the best I have found.  You can find their products in many outdoor outlets or go directly online to: https://gsioutdoors.com.

 

Legend of Jacques Cousteau Lives On from Port Sanibel Marina, Florida

  • Calypso’s Maiden Fishing Voyage – 106 miles from port in the Gulf of Mexico
  • Fishing Shark River, Outlet of the Florida Everglades
  • Four Roaring 350 Horsepower Mercury outboards
  • Shark On…the Adventure of a Lifetime!
Captain Ryan Kane with his new “Calypso,” a 42 foot long Renaissance Prowler with four 350 Hp Mercury Outboard engines. Ready for long-range fishing fun.  Shirley Holzhei Photo

By Bob Holzhei

“She was beautiful, gorgeous, erotic, and brand spanking new! Her curves and shape attracted the attention of fishermen everywhere and captured their hearts like falling in love for the first time. She was a virgin about to embark on her maiden voyage into the Gulf of Mexico ‘far beyond the sight of land,’ 106 miles from the dock at Sanibel Island Marina.

She was a mermaid in the water; I fell head over heels in love with her when I first saw her. As I boarded her, my heart rate increased in intensity. She took my breath away. A first touch, was followed by an embrace which led to anticipation in passion for the climax of the story! One never forgets falling in love for the first time.

“I grew up watching Jacques Cousteau as a kid, he’s a legend. His boat was named Calypso,” stated Captain Ryan Kane of Southern Instinct Fishing Charters.

“Cousteau was a French undersea explorer, researcher, photographer, and documentary host who invented diving and scuba devices, including the Aqua-Lung,” Kane added. “The television special – The World of Jacques – ran for nine seasons on ABC television network and had millions of followers. I had to name my new boat Calypso, it was only right.”

Calypso in Greek mythology was the daughter of the Titan god Atlas. Calypso symbolized forces that divert men from their goals, filled with intrigue and seduction. She was a nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. He refused to stay with her, so she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.

Captain Ryan Kane of Southern Instinct Fishing Charters is the best charter fishing captain in the state of Florida. We had fished with him before. My wife and I were invited to join Captain Ryan on the maiden voyage and it was a once-in-a-lifetime adventure.

Calypso is 42-feet long and has four 350 Mercury horsepower outboard engines mounted on her stern. Loaded and fueled, she weighs close to 14,000 pounds at the dock.

Matt Hatrick, first mate, played such an important role on board. A wealth of fishing knowledge too, he rigged the lines and baited our hooks with 12-15 inch long Spanish Mackerel and Mullet, and some lines with mullet, then became a momentary picture star holding up various fish for pictures. He was fun to be around.

12-15 inch long mullet and Spanish Mackerel were the primary shark bait that we fished off a bobber rig using current to deploy 200-300 feet from the boat. All the consumable baits on board come from Anderson’s Bait & Tackle in Fort Myers, FL. Dave Barus Photo

“I’m excited about this boat. It is in the forefront of boating technology. The forward angle and shape of her hull make the boat more gas efficient. I average 1 mile a gallon at a speed of 40 to 55 miles per hour, that’s pretty good for a boat this long and this heavy. It means comfort for all aboard and that why I bought a boat like this, for the clients,” added Kane.

The 42-foot tri-hull catamaran provided a smooth ride out to the fishing grounds, with one to three foot waves feeling almost non-existent.

Kane uses Dan James Custom rods and 60-pound line mounted on his Shimano reels. As we went fishing for sharks, he used size 8/0 Mustad hooks, strong and sharp.

Dave Barus (L) and Captain Ryan Kane with the Bull Shark that Barus caught. The shark was carefully released and swam away. One of several sharks we caught. Shirley Holzhei photo.

“Fish on!” Interrupted the conversation. The rod bent double! It was a big fish! It was fellow outdoor writer, Dave Barus with the next turn to reel a fish in. He was having trouble fighting the fish, the line ran out as the fish was so big, so strong and not about to give up in the first minute.

“Want to take a turn and fight the fish Bob?” Asked Barus.

“No, I’ve seen too many fish lost when transferring the rod to another person,” I replied.

Following the 26-minute fight, a large six-foot shark came to surface as it neared the boat, however it made a number of runs diving down deep into the Shark River in the direction of the Gulf waters and out of sight.

Finally, the brute was tiring. A rope was put on the tail to haul the Bull Shark aboard for pictures. The Bull Shark was 6 to 7 feet long, we estimated the weight at about 100 pounds.

The first “big fish” caught to date aboard Calypso was celebrated with a toast, with big-fish catcher Dave Barus popping the champagne cork and Captain Ryan Kane holding the glass, everyone shared – it was a special moment in time for all of us. Bob Holzhei Photo

Barus told me he was sore and tired after the Bull Shark was boated. I believed him.

It was a fantasy fishing trip out that was real, pinch me, in the Gulf of Mexico. I will relive this entire adventure long after we are back home to Michigan.

Anglers from all over the world come to Port Sanibel Marina, FL to fish with Captain Kane. I can verify, the fishing adventure of a lifetime awaits you. He can run 200 miles out in the Gulf of Mexico to where no fish has ever seen a hook, and back to the dock, all in less than a day fishing. Same day trophy fishing! This represents capability that no other charter fishing boats currently can offer from southwest Florida: time and distance, and unparalleled fishing fun.

For More information: Contact: www.southerninstinct.com or phone 239-896-2341. Accommodations: Lee County CVB/The Beaches of Fort Myers & Sanibel Island, www.fort-myers-sanibel.com, 1-800-237-6444.

Affordable Offshore Charter Fishing near Englewood Beach, Florida

  • 5 hour Offshore Fishing Trip, we caught more than 50 fish!
  • Cost was so affordable, all gear and bait was provided
  • Enjoyable day, the captain cleaned all the fish!

By Bob Holzhei

Dave Barus with one of the many fish we hooked up with and released. we caught so many hard-fighting fish in such a short time. Was such fun! Bob Holzhei Photo

The fishing action in the Gulf of Mexico was like playing pinball. It was non-stop action baiting the hook and dropping the baited hook down to bottom, then reeling the line in three full turns. Bang! Boom! Hang on to the rod!

Live shrimp were among the baits we used to fool so many fish in such a short time. These were hooked up with a size 3 hook below a 2-ounce slide sinker using 40-pound mono tied to 40-pound braid. Forrest Fisher Photo

Dave Barus, an outdoor writer from western New York and I booked a charter with Captain Terry Heller.  The boat was launched out of Placida, FL and we fished about 8-1/2 miles off shore, far beyond the sight of land.  There were no other boats in sight as three-foot waves grew in intensity to about five feet.  We were alone in the Gulf of Mexico and became part of the natural world that day, bobbing and bouncing around like a little cork for a few hours. The chop didn’t hurt the fishing.

A Lowrance GPS guided us to Heller’s many hotspots where he has been successful before.  In each, a small buoy was dropped to mark the area and the anchor was released to hold the boat where fish showed up on the fish finder.

Captain Terry Heller drops a special buoy that allows him to mobilize his boat position in relation to this known marker spot and navigate his fishing clients over tiny rock beds that hold giant and plentiful fish on the bottom. Forrest Fisher Photo

The bait was dropped in 50-57 feet of water, then pulled up from the bottom three full turns on the reel.

“Fish-on!” I yelled as the hook was set.

“Fish-On!” Yelled Barus.

After my first Key West Grunt was boated, Heller hurried to the other side of the boat to assist Barus with battling the fish.  Ocean fish fight much harder than expected and a couple of times Captain Heller had to hold onto the rod as I lifted the rod up and reeled line in on the down stroke.  “I gotta start a harder workout each day (note to myself).” The rod tip jumped again and again, and setting the hook hard was advised by Heller because the various saltwater fish out there have such tough mouths.

Captain Terry Heller baited the Eagle Claw size 3 hook with a variety of baits including shrimp, cut squid and sardines.  A 7-1/2 foot Sussex rod with a 300-400 series Penn Reel had 20-pound braid line on it.

The fishing reels were 300-400 series saltwater models with tough, durable braided line. Forrest Fisher Photo

Heller started fishing with his father at 65 years ago when he was 5 years old and has been a full-time professional fishing guide for 5 years in Florida.

The center console walk-around 24-foot Polar boat was equipped with a 225 horsepower Yamaha four-stroke outboard and also had an 80-pound torque Minn Kota trolling motor on the bow.

Red and Gag Grouper were caught, Snapper, Sea Bass, Trigger fish, Tom Toms and Key West Grunts. Wow! Many fish were released back in the water because the season had not opened yet, but we caught more than 50 fish in 3 short hours of bottom dipping with bait in the right places. Caption Heller cleaned, filleted and bagged the fish for us, all part of the trip cost.

“When you like to do something you love, it’s not hard.  I like taking 10-year old’s fishing, especially my grandkids.  No only do they learn fast, but they also have patience.  They really like catching big Groupers,” concluded Heller.

We fished for $165 apiece. A great value and a fun trip. For additional information, Captain Heller says you can call him at 941-587-4460.

The 24′ boat was so tough out there, very durable, I felt safe the entire trip. Forrest Fisher Photo

 

Custom Fishing Rod Builder: Tom Marks

  • Rod length, sensitivity, power, flex…all these factors matter
  • Setting the hook, it’s the best feeling with a rod you helped design
  • Rattlesnake skin and other custom handles personalize rods to the individual

By Bob Holzhei

Custom rod handle options that include rattlesnake skin personalize the custom rod.

“The sensitivity in any fishing rod can be determined by placing the tip of the rod against your throat while another person holds the other end of the rod.  At that point, the person who has the tip of the rod against their throat begins to talk and at the other end, the vibration can be felt,” says expert angler and custom fishing rod-maker, Tom Marks, who vacations and fishes in Florida during the winter months.

Marks has been building custom rods for the past six years. “It usually takes me about 48 hours or three days to build a rod,” says Marks.

“I ask the perspective customer which type of rod they want me to build for them, whether it’s a spin casting rod, an all-purpose rod, and also ask if they are throwing crankbaits, need a worm rod, like to drop shot, if they are skipping docks, tossing jerk baits, Carolina rigs, need a bottom-bouncer for walleye, jig-flipping and pitching, or if they use a frog topwater bait or other top water bait. They’re all slightly different,” stated Marks.

Sanding the guide feet insures a smooth thread wrap and long life for the rod.

“The purpose for which the rod will be used helps me decide on the power and speed of the rod. The power, which is how stiff the rod needs to be and the speed, which refers to how much flex is in the tip, both affect the style efficiency.  Flex is the amount of bend in the upper 1/3 of the rod. The faster the rod, the more sensitive it will feel. For crankbaits, or moving baits which are trolled, a slower rod is sufficient because the strike or bite is much harder. The slower rod helps absorb some of the initial shock of the bite and also keeps the fish from throwing the hook,” added Marks.

Marks custom decorates his precision fishing rods according to customer wishes.  Nylon and metallic threads can be used on the guide wraps, and many other variations.  Marks also uses real rattlesnake skin on the handle and other decorative skins and wraps in the split grip and fore grip.

“I place a decorative thread band 12 inches from the front edge of the handle.  Decorative work might include thread work cross-weaved with multiple colored threads or chevron patterns.  Occasionally I marbleize the colors,” added Marks.

Marks began purchasing his rod building materials after he saw a Mudhole display at an outdoor show, located in Oviedo, Florida.  Mudhole is a Rod Building and Tackle Crafting Company that can provide helpful process instructions and all the supplies for rod building. Visit www.mudhole.com or call 866-790-RODS.

Charter Captain Tom Marks is right at home with all the gear for making his custom fishing rods in the garage.

Marks explained the steps in building a rod. “After the materials are ordered and arrive, I first take the order out of the package,” Marks replied while laughing.     “First the spline in the rod is found, this is the backbone of the rod.  I take the rod and put tension on it, while rolling the rod. The area of the spine will snap or hop.  The spline is the heaviest part of the rod. The theory is the spline is found in one spot, it provides a keyway for guide location and better angler control later,” stated Marks.

Second, Marks determines what kind of rod he will make.  The handle or grip is put on the rod.  He reams out the handle to fit the blank.  Then Pro-epoxy paste is put on to secure the handle.

Third, the guides are put on after measuring and marking the rod blank for the spacing between the guides.  Mudhole provides suggestions on where to place the guides.  Marks runs a line up and down the tip to insure the guides are lined up.  He also uses a laser beam to insure the guides are correctly aligned.  After the guide are mounted, protective clear epoxy is added.

Fourth, two additional coats of clear epoxy are put on and then 400 grit sandpaper removes any imperfections. Marks then field tests the rod to assure quality.

“If I catch a big fish while testing, I know that particular rod is a real good one,” kidded Marks with a grin.

“Building fishing rods is a great hobby and I never stop learning.  I began fishing with my dad when I was 4 years old, and when I was 10, I really got into fishing and loved it.  I learned from my father how to fish for walleye, since we lived within walking distance of Lake Erie near Derby, New York,” stated Marks.

I tagged along with Marks as he fished with the rod and learned as I watched his fishing strategy from a distance.

“The presentation is the key. The bite is what keeps me interested.  When I set the hook – it’s a great feeling. There’s a rush of adrenaline!  I could fish all day for the bite,” concluded Marks.

For more information: e-mail address – capt.tommarks@gmail.com; 716-997-6919.

Here we are testing my new rod, I’m sitting, Tom is demonstrating the secrets to catching bass where we are fishing in Florida. Sure was fun!

Fishing the Gulf of Mexico with Captain Ryan Kane

  • Fishing Fun, Seashells, Sightseeing and Dolphins near Port Sanibel, in Southwest Florida 
  • Bobbers, Shrimp, Speckled Trout and FEW SUPRISES made for a VERY RELAXING DAY
  • Screeching Drags, Fully-arched Rods, Tight Lines & Good Knots

By Bob Holzhei

Dolphins followed the boat, surfacing numerous times, as three 250 horsepower Yamaha engines powered the 36 foot Contender.  Shirley Holzhei Photo

The 36-foot Contender was impressive as we walked down the dock right after sunrise.  There were three 250 horsepower Yamaha outboards on the stern and we were met with a giant warm greeting from Captain Ryan Kane of Southern Instinct Fishing Charters.  The targeted species for the all-day charter included Kingfish, Mackerel, Barracuda and Cobia, according to Kane.

I had fished the Gulf of Mexico for the first time, years ago, as one of a dozen outdoor writers selected from the United States.  The group was chosen from the Association of Great Lakes Outdoor Writers and included a writer from Outdoor Life Magazine in New York.

The opportunity to fish the ocean out of Port Sanibel, Florida, was exciting.  Fellow outdoor writer Dave Barus, his wife Rose and my wife Shirley, all joined up for the all-day charter fishing trip.  The trip had been cancelled twice due to high seas and on this day, the winds did the same, but we went anyway.  The seas started at two feet, but eventually rose and crested to five-foot levels, which resulted in pulling the lines and fishing the shelter between two islands closer to shore.

Our trip began with a slow troll out of Port Sanibel Marina and then the fun started, as Captain Kane increased our speed to 30 mph.  The three outboards roared, though they were just at half-throttle.  The scent of the ocean salt water, the memory of over-cresting waves and the spray from the wake slapping the boat was frozen in time.  As we arrived at the fishing grounds the lines were let out 90 feet behind the boat.

“I use 15 pound braid and 60 to 80-pound test fluorocarbon leader line spooled on the Shimano reels.  These are mounted on my Dan James Custom Rods that I use because of their ability to hold up under the challenge of big, bad, ocean fish,” stated Kane.

My wife, Shirley, landed a playful Bonnet-head Shark which was carefully released by conservation-minded, Captain Ryan Kane. Bob Holzhei photo

“The Dan James Custom Rods do exactly what they’re intended to do.  Other rods break under the pressure.  The Shimano reels are ergonomically correct and anglers have an easier time with these reels, they’re a step above other reels. The way the reel is made, the size of the handle and the ease of using it, is worth the cost,” added Kane.

Kane field tests several other Dan James Custom Rods that are in the prototype or development stage prior to these going into production.

The wind speed rose yet again to 35 mph and Captain Kane was forced to head for calmer waters.  We boated towards the safety of islands and dolphins surfaced, following us for the fun of jumping in the boat wake.  Time stopped again and I also became air-born, but unlike the dolphins, I would not reenter the ocean.  Rather, I would take flight on the never-ending memory of such an incredible experience. The dolphins were only three to four feet away!  Their eyes and expressions were talking to me.

Eventually, we stopped to fish in a sheltered and secret Captain Kane spot.  We caught speckled ocean trout and these have a slot limit between 15 and 20 inches under Florida fishing regulations.  In addition, Shirley caught a handsome Bonnet Head Shark and we released it unharmed.

“Fish on!” Rose Barus yelped from the front of the boat.

I grabbed the rod that was in a rod holder right next to me.  The drag was screaming!  This was a bigger fish as line screeched and shouted from the Shimano open-face reel.  I tightened the drag on the reel, but the fish was too green yet in its attempt to free itself from the hook.  After 15 minutes or so, my arms and shoulders tired and I asked Dave Barus to take over.  Barus moved from side to side of the boat as the fight continued bow to aft.

Outdoor buddy, Dave Barus, holds up a Stingray after the venomous stinger was removed, as I watch in the background. Shirley Holzhei Photo

Finally we saw the fish, it was not a fish!  It was a Stingray!  The 40-45-pound Stingray stretched over three feet in width.  When it first surfaced, I got my first look at it and it dove down deep again in an attempt to free itself.  It surfaced a number of times, going under the boat in an attempt to get loose.  Barus put his finger on the drag spool in order to add slightly more manual drag and keep the reel from burning up.  The spool holding the line was actually hot.  The battle lasted over 45 minutes before a gaff hook was carefully placed to bring the Stingray aboard where the venomous stinger was cut off by Captain Kane.  The captain provided us with instructions to place the stinger in an empty water bottle for now and then later, add bleach until the stinger turned white.  The venom would be neutralized then and safe to handle.  Another stinger would grow on the ray.

“Get over here Bob, and get in the picture,” stated Rose Barus.

Following some quick photos, the Stingray was released into the ocean and swam back into its natural habitat.

“Southern Instinct Charters offers a world-class fishing adventure off the waters of Fort Myers and Sanibel Island.  Tarpon, Kingfish, Redfish, monster Snook, Wahoo, Tuna, Red Snapper, Cobia and sharks are additional species that Captain Kane will target at your request.  Inshore and offshore fishing adventures are offered, in addition to shelling and sightseeing trips.

The memory of the day-long fishing charter will live on forever in my mind and I will once again experience fishing the Gulf of Mexico in the future to escape the frigid Michigan winter for this warmer climate.

Fishing the Gulf of Mexico was the fishing adventure of a lifetime and I plan now to return again and again to re-live the permanent memory of this experience.  I will fish with Kane another year and it is no surprise to me that his open date list is short.

For anyone from across the country, if you seek the fun of a new big fish adventure, choose Southern Instinct Fishing Charters. It’ll be trip of a lifetime.

For additional information:  www.southerninstinct.com phone 239 896-2341 and Lee County CVB/The Beaches of Fort Myers & Sanibel Island www.fort-myers-sanibel.com 1 800 237-6444  

Sacred Water at Devils Lake: Legend of the Lake Monster

"Legends of Black Lake monsters supercede pictures and tales of monster walleye that exist here. Secrets are many," says Bob Holzhei, story writer.

  • Devils Lake, Part 2: Legend of the Lake Monster       
  • Walleye, Northern Pike, Crappie, lots of fish here
  • Lures and Baits of all sorts Catch Fish on Devils Lake
We caught lots of walleye every day we fished, usually between 50 and 100 each time, but there was always some mystery about that “Lake Monster Legend.” Forrest Fisher photo

By Bob Holzhei

Early European-Americans termed the lake “Bad Spirit Lake” because of high salinity water, making it unfit to drink.  With summer, mirages were often seen across the water and the lake was referred to as “Spirit Lake,” as reflected in the Spirit Lake Indian Tribe.

Published reports of a “Lake Monster” date as far back as 1894, while Native American legends go back much further about a Loch Ness serpent in Devil’s Lake.

It is said locally that the monster is not often seen, but here is what we saw on one day when we fished the lake.  Forrest Fisher photo

Whether fact or fiction, stories of the Devil’s Lake Monster have been reportedly sighted and recounted in many newspapers, including the New York Sun in 1984, the Bismarck Tribune in 1895 and the Wichita Beacon in 1904.

All descriptions of the serpent indicate it has alligator jaws and glaring red eyes, a tail stretching to 80 feet long and it usually appears at sunset during August.  The serpent moves slowly, often seen about a half mile from shore and reported to circle the lake twice a day.  A slimy green color, the serpent’s motion sends gentle surface waves along from head to tail with the wake visible as it pushes along.

Early accounts of the Devil’s Lake Monster may be sensationalized accounts reported in newspapers in order to draw tourists to the area. Whether fact or fiction, my camera did accompany me on a guided fishing trip to Devil’s Lake in August. Today I can attest that our guide did fish more than a half mile from the mainland shore. Hmmmm.

While we chuckled about the fabled monster chronicles, Devils Lake in North Dakota is an angler’s dream and is open to fishing all year long. Ice fishing is especially fun here with heated huts and the aroma of smoked sausage on the grill.

No matter the time of year, multiple species here keep every angler in action for most of the fishing day. Foot-long perch are common, walleye in all-sizes – from eaters to wall hangers are the usual resident and non-resident angler focus, northern pike ranging from 5 to 10 pounds are the largest predator fish, while white bass, panfish (crappie and bluegill) and trout, provide a variety of fishing opportunities at Devil’s Lake. It’s fun to fish here.

Baitcasting rigs are the norm here, as you never know how big that next walleye monster might be, that’s not a legend. Forrest Fisher photo

A variety of popular fishing strategies include slip bobber fishing, rigging, jigging, casting, trolling with crankbaits and enticing hungry fish with bottom-bouncers when the usual hot bite is off, which is not very often. We caught over 50 walleye each day of our fishing.

My friend and our guide on Devils Lake was Al Freidig, he shared secrets and how to catch fish in this vast waterway. Forrest Fisher photo

The Devil’s Lake Basin is the second largest body of water in North Dakota after Lake Sakakawea.  Once the lake reaches a high level of 1,458 feet, it flows into the Sheyenne and Red Rivers, though overflow occurred only twice in the last 4,000 years. Historically the area is the site of the Dakota people who relocated there as a result of The 1867 Treaty with the United States.

One of our favorite 3-way rig bottom-bouncing baits on Devils Lake, these worked very well.

The lake stretches over 380 square miles with an average maximum depth of about 47 feet. Lots of room for fish and fishermen, and the Devils Lake monster.

Hold onto your rod.  You never know, you could become a legendary friend.

For more info on where to stay or who to call for guide services, contact:  https://www.ndtourism.com/cities/devils-lake.

 

 

Devil’s Lake, North Dakota – Part 1, Walleye Expectations Exceeded!

Mike Schoonveld caught our largest walleye of the day, but we hooked more than 75 fish, some nice perch too, in a half-day on the water. Imagine that.

  • Devils Lake is located in East-Central North Dakota – 1000 Shoreline Miles of Walleye Access
  • More than 100 Fishing Guides are Certified to provide Services on Devils Lake
  • Best Walleye Baits: Jigs, Crankbaits, Crawler Harnesses
Outdoor writer Dave Barus with the first walleye of the day.

By Bob Holzhei

There are 105 registered fishing guides who regularly host avid anglers to fish Devil’s Lake, North Dakota, many of them will find the fishing adventure of their lifetime. High expectations?  Not really, especially when a person considers there is steady fishing action success experienced throughout the year, including ice fishing. The 180,000 acres of Devils Lake provide more than 1,000 miles of shoreline.

Walleyes were targeted the first day of fishing on Devil’s Lake, however, there are northern pike, perch, crappie, panfish, trout and white bass among other popular angler species. 

When even I can catch walleye at the rate of 10 per hour, YOU KNOW the fishing is great at Devils Lake, ND.

The annual Association of Great Lakes Outdoor Writer’s annual conference was held in September at Bismarck Mandan, North Dakota, and writers from all over the country discovered history, fishing, hunting and wonderful people. While there, an invitation was extended by Tanner Cherney, a host with the Devil’s Lake Convention & Visitor’s Bureau to join him and others at Devil’s Lake to experience their excellent walleye fishery.

My wife Shirley and I arrived late at Devils Lake, but we were just in time to meet local guide groups and experience the walleye fishing on nationally renowned Devil’s Lake.

Mike Schoonveld caught our largest walleye of the day, but we hooked more than 75 fish, some nice perch too, in a half-day on the water. Imagine that.

Captain Al Freidig, our local guide for the afternoon put my fishing partner, Dave Barus, and myself on the walleye. A total of 28 walleye were caught, many in the 12-14-inch range that speaks well for the future fishery here, all of these were caught and released, and we kept four for the table.

Crawler harnesses with nightcrawler bits on number 2 and 4 hooks were tied-up using 14-pound Berkley Fireline, these produced the steady action. Fenwick rods paired with Abu Garcia reels provided for easy fun in catching these fish in 18 to 27 feet of water. We used white spinner blade colors on the harnesses with the hooks baited with a half-nightcrawler.  Bottom bouncing over a rocky structure near drop-offs was the fishing strategy for the day. 

A professional fishing guide for 18 years, Freidig is sponsored by Devil’s Lake Tourism and he knows his stuff. He was entered in the North Dakota Fishing Hall of Fame in 2015 and is still active in lake access management, as well as maintaining boat ramps and cleaning stations Tobe free of charge and open to the general public. Freidig says, “Hang on guys, you’ll enjoy my 20-foot Ranger Fisherman and 250 horsepower Merc.” He zoomed us across the open lake to reach a variety of fishing spot in record time.

The best part of every trip, making room in the freezer. Mike Schoonveld (right) and I enjoyed using this wonderful fish-cleaning station located right at the Sleep Inn Hotel in Devils Lake.

Freidig’s boat rule is a good one for future conservation promotion, as he asked us to only keep walleye over 16 inches in length, allowing the smaller eyes to grow over the next year. We sure agreed to that idea. If you haven’t been here yet, put it on your bucket list.

For additional information: Devils Lake Convention & Visitor’s Bureau P.O. Box 879 Devils Lake, North Dakota 58301, www.devilslakend.com, 701 662-4903, or contact Tanner Cherney: e-mail – tanner@devilslakend.com, 701-662-4957. Contact guide, Al Freidig al@realestate7.com 701-662-7171.

Ducks Unlimited: A Leader in Wetland Preservation

As a result of waterfowl and wetlands management, hunters and people enjoy

Today, engineering and science are the focus of study to achieve balanced waterfowl and wetlands management at the Ducks Unlimited headquarters in Bismarck, North Dakota.
  • Waterfowl and Wetlands Emerge as Conservation Heroes
  • Cooperation and Passion feed Understanding and New Science
  • Ducks, Geese, People…all need Wetlands

by Bob Holzhei

     The novel, The Grapes of Wrath, written by John Steinbeck, was published in 1939 and two years earlier, at the height of the Oklahoma Dust Bowl, dried up wetlands across North America, resulted in plummeting duck populations.

     The novel described the story of human unity, love and the need for cooperation.  However, the effects of the stock market crash in October 1929 lasted long and the Dust Bowl created a sense of desperation as folks moved across the country and away from their homes.

     In the midst of hopelessness and despair, an idea for an organization was conceived in New York City when waterfowlers met in 1930. They saw a need to raise money to preserve and maintain wetlands across the United States.  The original organization was called More Game Birds in America Foundation, which established a 10-year plan for increasing upland game bird populations.  The Federal Government created many wildlife refuges at that time focusing on flyways and refuges, thus creating breeding habitat in the North as well as migration and wintering habitat in other areas.  Eventually the flyways became super flyways.

     Discussion of the future of wildfowl led to wildlife management which was in its infancy stages.  State and federal agencies became involved as a new science began, which was pioneered by Aldo Leopold, a professor of game management at the University of Wisconsin.  Other colleges and universities also began developing courses in wildlife biology and management.

     Suggestions for modernizing the name from More Game Birds in America Foundation to simply Ducks was made, however in Canada, corporations are legally designated as “Limited.”  So the name didn’t fit perfectly, as the organization did not want populations of Ducks Limited.  Thus, the name Ducks Unlimited came about.

     In 1934 the first duck stamp was issued and the money generated was earmarked for duck habitat.

     Ducks Unlimited was established in North America in 1937 as dried up wetlands during the Dust Bowl resulted in decreasing duck populations across the country.  Ducks Unlimited emerged as a grassroots organization which was volunteer based consisting of members who were conservation-minded and outdoor enthusiasts.

     The vision seemed unattainable as the idea was conceived.  Perhaps the thought would settle in the dust and become buried. That did not happen. 

     As of 2017, the Ducks Unlimited annual report indicated 14 million acres of land have been conserved since the founding of the organization.  The “Rescue our Wetlands” campaign was funded by donations from supporters and organizations across the United States.

     Wetlands are crucial for many reasons.  According to Ducks Unlimited, “Wetlands filter drinking water and refill ground water sources, prevent flooding, protect coasts from hurricanes, and provide recreational opportunities for birds, hunters, anglers and boaters.”

     The despair from the years of the Dust Bowl described by Steinbeck transformed as a need for cooperation and led to the emergence of Ducks Unlimited. 

     Over time, The Grapes of Wrath became a beautiful vineyard, thanks to the efforts of Ducks Unlimited.