The Last Cast

Time for One Last Cast

  • Sunrise, Sunset, Starshine…life-long breathtaking moments
  • Family, Fishing, Memories, Doctors…and Reality 
  • Radiation, Chemo…Time to Re-Rig 
A Morning Alone on the Lake

By Larry Whiteley

He was alone on the lake. The sunrise was breathtaking. He had seen lots of mornings but none this beautiful. His first cast landed near some bushes. He felt the thump and set the hook. The largemouth came out of the water, trying to shake the bait. It fought hard but soon tired. He gently lifted it from the water, smiled, and released it.

There would be many more fish to visit with that morning. One was the biggest smallmouth he had ever caught in all his years of fishing. The sunlight glistened off its bronze body. He managed to take a selfie of him and the fish. As he hit send on his smartphone, he smiled. A son texted back, “Nice one, Dad.” Another son replied, “Good fish, old man!” A grandson asked, “What did you catch it on?” His wife texted, “Are you doing okay, and how are you feeling?” He smiled and texted back each of them with only the words “I love you” and then went back to fishing.

The Thrill of Fishing

It suddenly occurred to him that he had not heard or seen another boat all morning. Kind of felt like he was fishing on his own private lake. He heard crows, ducks, and geese. He saw deer and turkey at the water’s edge. Birds were flittering around everywhere and singing their songs. A hummingbird even came buzzing by thinking he was a big flower. He said to himself, “Is this what heaven will be like for a fisherman like me?” He smiled again.

Sometimes even the blind squirrel finds the nut.

The afternoon sun was high and hot. He motored into a shaded cove and shut off the engine. The slight breeze felt good there in the shade. He tied the boat to a tree, sat back, and relaxed. Thoughts of the first fish he ever caught went through his mind. He saw the bobber, the worm, his cane pole. He felt the little perch squirming in his hand. The particular feeling, he had that day alone on that creek, was unlike any other. He was hooked. It was the first of many fish he would catch in his lifetime.

As he stretched out in the boat, he looked up at the sky and saw a cross formed by clouds and a jet stream. He grinned and said, thank you. More memories flooded his mind. He wished his Dad would have taken him fishing, but he didn’t. He thought of times he took his son’s fishing, recalling the look on their faces when they caught their first fish. He wished he hadn’t been so busy trying to make a living and would have taken his boys fishing more. But, they both grew up to be fishermen. They both became good husbands, fathers, and Godly men. Their kids became fishermen too. They had a dad that took them and a papaw too. There was no doubt in his mind that his grandkids would also take their kids fishing. He smiled once more and was proud. He hoped that more people would discover the magic of fishing and pass it on.

With the gentle rocking of the boat, his eyes got heavy. A nap came easy. It was a much-needed rest. The hospital visits and all the medicine had taken its toll. Late afternoon, he awoke to the screeching sounds of an eagle flying in the sky above him. It was out fishing too.

As he lay there watching the eagle, he wished he had more time left. He thought that he would go back to Canada fishing for walleye and pike with his son and grandson. Travel with his other son and grandson’s to the Northwood’s for those good-eating yellow perch. Going back to catch a snook or grouper in Tampa Bay or speckled trout at Gulf Shores would also be on his list. A limit of crappie, some trout fishing, or maybe catfishing would be good too. Grabbing a mess of suckers and frying them up on the river bank would really be fun, one more time. He even thought about going wade fishing in a creek or sitting on a farm pond, on the bank. Alaska salmon and halibut fishing were on his bucket list. So was fishing for redfish. It had never happened, and now there was not enough time.

It Was Like Heaven Was Opening

The sunset was beautiful in the western sky. The bats began their dance with the approaching darkness, it was feeding time. He listened to the owls and the whip-poor-wills as they started their nightly chorus. The smell of new-mown hay and someone’s campfire drifted through the air. He knew he should be heading home. His wife would be worried. In the gathering dusk, he wanted to fish just a little longer.

The doctor had told him the radiation and chemo was not working. This was his last time to fish. He was at peace with that because he knew where he was going. He had messed up his life at times. He had made mistakes. He had gotten his life straightened out and was walking the path he should have been all along. He wished he had more time to tell his wife and family he loved them and make more memories. He wished he had more time to say to others that no matter what they did wrong, they could still go where he was going.

A Reminder From Above

The boat roared to life, and he headed for his favorite fishing spot near the ramp to make another cast or maybe two. In the half-light, he cast toward the bank. The topwater bait gurgled across the surface. A massive bass slammed it, and the fight was on. When the battle was finally over, and he lifted it out of the water, it was bigger than the one earlier in the day. He removed the bait from its cavernous mouth, lowered it back into the water, and in the dim light, watched it swim away. He looked up into the night sky filled with millions of stars and, with a tear in his eye and a smile on his face, said, “thank you!”

“Just one more cast,” he told himself. The lure hits the water. A fish engulfs it. The battle begins and then suddenly stops. He’s snagged. The line snaps. “That’s okay,” he says to himself and smiles again. Too dark now to re-rig. It’s time to go home. He looked up at the night sky, and it looked as if heaven was opening. It was his last cast.

Love of my Outdoor World was Drowned in Alcohol

  • When do you know when you need help?
  • When people distance themselves from you, you know something is not right.
  • It feels good to know yourself when you find help, define a solution and make a resolution. 
Looking for shark teeth on a Florida beach, most people always saw me as a happy-go-lucky sort of guy, but I had a secret.

By Bob Holzhei

My love affair with the outdoor world began as I grew up on a family farm in the early 1950s. The world was filled with unlimited possibilities.

It was almost 55 years later that everything changed and my life soared out of control due to alcohol. I realized that I needed help and voluntarily signed myself into an alcohol rehabilitation center.

Although I stopped drinking, I discovered that refraining from alcohol was the easy part. I soon found that there was a more complicated and challenging part of staying away from drinking, but I had no control over that part.

I only knew that a couple of “my best friends” would understand my struggle. I confided in them and they were understanding, one friend phoned a few times to see how I was doing. That was very considerate of him.

I felt our children would be understanding and supportive; I was wrong. Prior to my downfall a few weeks earlier, I was working on arrangements to spend winter in a warmer Florida climate. My wife made a phone call one Saturday morning to a close friend in Florida. After the call, it was evident that she was distraught, and she openly shared with me a brief summary of the conversation. “We don’t feel it would be good for you to come to Florida, this year,” she stated.

Alcoholism is a disease and is the most widely understood illness in America. Shirley Hozlhei photo

Apparently, from the friend’s previous history with her father as a policeman, she had witnessed other alcoholic friends returning to their old habits without proper remedial longevity in training. I was shocked, although I understood the rationale that followed the dialogue.

I had no problem with the fact that close friends wanted to distance themselves from me, but my main problem at that moment was that the dialogue had upset my wife. If there was a problem with my drinking, the individual(s) involved should have contacted me directly, not my wife; though I realize now that they were just as concerned about me as my wife. My wife had suffered enough from my years of alcoholism.

One in eight individuals in the U.S. is an alcoholic and eight percent or less seek help. Forrest Fisher photo

The first people that distanced themselves from my wife and myself were our children and their families. One written letter from one of the four family members stated: “Unfortunately, we need to set boundaries and you are not welcome at our house. For years you have faced demons, you have created chaos and drama around the holidays. You have demons you are facing from your past childhood experiences. This chaos you have created has now impacted each of us, and you continue to steal our joy. We can not allow you to do this any longer.”

A portion of my two-page response began with: “Thank you for your honesty expressed in the letter. My words are also candid and straight-forward.”

The people that we hurt the most include our closest family and friends that we love the most. Forrest Fisher photo

Highlights include: “Feeling broken. I suppose its all my fault, however, it is not.  No longer welcome at your home, I have no problem with that.  Mental state, I feel better than ever since I’ve stopped drinking.  I feel mentally healthy and am improving each day.”

I fully realize that I can’t change how others react to my alcoholism.  I accept that, however, talking with my wife over the phone and indicating, “It would be best if you didn’t come down to Florida this year,” was unacceptable.  On second thought, maybe they cared so much about me that they feared that leaving my 6-week old rehab mentors at the AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) back home would be an even more significant problem for my wife…and even more for me.

According to the www.addictioncenter.com, Alcohol addiction, also known as alcoholism, is marked by a craving for alcohol and the inability to stop drinking—even when it causes extreme personal or social harm. Signs of alcohol addiction include frequently drinking more than intended, wanting to stop drinking but being unable to, developing a tolerance to alcohol, feeling symptoms of withdrawal when stopping, letting personal and professional responsibilities flounder in favor of drinking and spending an extreme amount of time trying to get and drink alcohol. FOR MORE INFORMATION on Alcoholism, please CONTACT YOUR LOCAL AA CHAPTER (https://www.aa.org/).

We never stop learning new lessons in life when we have a dependency on things that go out of control, and new habits are hard to form.

One thing I know for sure, I’m sticking to the recovery program and friends that care more than I know.