Best Tasting Venison Burgers, Ezy-Peezy & Fast

By Fern Fisher

This is the easiest, fastest, most tasty and quick recipe for delicious venison burgers.

Everyone that visits our humble abode says they love it, so I’m sharing it with you all. Please let me know what you think.

Hand-form the burgers, place on foil, to get ready to make a “foil bag” to place on grill.

Ingredients:
1 lb ground venison
½ lb lean ground beef
2 eggs (beaten)
1 cup Italian seasoned bread crumbs, adjust with the addition of water to mix for proper burger forming/consistency
1/2 cup finely chopped Vidalia onion
1 tsp salt
½ tsp pepper
4 tablespoons finely chopped garlic
Hellman’s Mayonaisse

Red, yellow or green pepper – slice ¼ inch wide to place on top of burgers before cooking, as noted below

Combine all the ingredients by hand in a mixing bowl.

Mix ingredients.
Combine all the ingredients as noted above except for the pepper slices. Add ½ – 1 cup water to make mix pliable and to allow the ingredients to exchange flavor. Hand form 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick burger patties and set aside.

Cooking:
Place the burgers individually in aluminum foil. Lightly coat the area with olive oil where the burger will be placed. Add a thin layer of Hellman’s mayonnaise to the top of each burger, as shown, then add 2 strips of your sliced sweet pepper.

Then close up the aluminum foil making it a bag-like compartment, making the foil almost airtight. Leave one end slight open and add 2 oz of water to the bag. Close the open end and place the foiled burgers on the outdoor grill or in a 325-degree oven for about 15 minutes to 20 minutes (when the meat reaches 165F minimum).

Add a thin layer of Hellman’s Mayo, two slices of sweet pepper – your choice of variety, fold and form the top of bag and ends of the bag to form a pouch. Add a few ounces of water to one end of bag, place on a hot backyard grill. Done in 15-20 minutes. Soooo good.

The foil keeps the moisture in and allows the meat to cook in its own juices. It’s a mini-pressure cooker and cooks very fast. The water inside does not escape and so this helps to keep it from burning and over-cooking.

This is easy and using your backyard grill, you can cook 30 burgers for a small army or visitors group all at once in this manner. Other options include adding a full slice of onion and a sliced mushroom before sealing the foil.

Once cooked, add a leaf of lettuce, a slice of tomato, a slice of cheese and your favorite condiments.

Venison Reuben, from the kitchen of Charlie Killmaster – Georgia State Deer Biologist

Each year that goes by, I search for recipes that are worth sharing because they meet the rules of “Easy-To-Make” and “Delicious-To-Eat.” Charlie Killmaster from Georgia has several great game recipes. Here is one of them and there are more at this site: https://georgiawildlife.blog/2018/12/12/oh-deer-7-venison-recipes-youve-gotta-try/.

Charlie Killmaster’s photo of his delicious Venison Reuben.

Ingredients:

  • Venison roast, preferably shoulder/neck, 1 to 3 lbs.
  • Thick-cut rye bread
  • Spicy brown mustard or Thousand Island dressing, your preference
  • 1 tablespoon pickling spice
  • Morton’s Tender Quick, or your salt/sugar brine of choice
  • Sauerkraut
  • Swiss cheese
  • Crock pot

Charlie says, “I always prefer bone-in roasts from the front of the deer for this recipe. Start by making a brine using the directions on Morton’s Tender Quick or any other recipe for a salt and sugar brine. Make enough brine to totally submerge the meat and mix in the pickling spice. You can marinate anywhere from 1 to 5 days, but I find 3 days to be ideal before it gets to be too salty.

Whenever I’m processing a deer I harvested, I like to go ahead and brine 3 or 4 chunks of meat before I freeze it so I don’t have to wait on brining each time. Just thaw and cook when you’re ready. Next, rinse the meat and cook in a crock pot with plain water for about 8 hours. Shred the meat and assemble the sandwiches with the mustard or dressing, sauerkraut, cheese, and toasted bread.

To prevent a soggy sandwich, I like to heat up the sour kraut and squeeze with a paper towel to soak up excess moisture. Serve with fries or your favorite side dish and enjoy!”

 

 

CWD Testing More Important NOW Than Ever

  • MDC will conduct mandatory CWD sampling in 25 counties Nov. 11 and 12.
  • Check the fall deer and turkey booklet to see if your county is included.
  • Hunters can get deer tested for free throughout archery and firearms deer seasons.

By Jim Low

The thrills of deer hunting – not to mention the pleasure of eating venison, are worth taking precautions to protect.  Jim Low Photo

The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) needs help from hunters to keep the deadly deer disease called chronic wasting disease (CWD) from spreading to more deer in more areas of Missouri. In light of recent developments, hunters might want to take advantage of free testing for personal reasons, too.
MDC will conduct mandatory CWD sampling of hunter-harvested deer in 25 counties during the opening weekend of the fall firearms deer season, Nov. 11 and 12. Counties included in this year’s sampling effort are: Adair, Barry, Benton, Cedar, Cole, Crawford, Dade, Franklin, Hickory, Jefferson, Knox, Linn, Macon, Moniteau, Ozark, Polk, St. Charles, St. Clair, St. Francois, Ste. Genevieve, Stone, Sullivan, Taney, Warren, and Washington. These counties comprise Missouri’s CWD Management Zone. It includes counties where MDC conducted mandatory CWD testing last year, plus St. Clair County, where a new outbreak was detected earlier this year, and five adjacent counties.

Concerns about possible exposure to CWD can be addressed by taking advantage of free testing. Jim Low Photo

MDC also has added four counties along the Arkansas border in southwest Missouri to the CWD Management Zone. CWD has not been detected in any of these counties yet, but a serious outbreak of the fatal deer disease just across the border is cause for extra vigilance there.
Hunters who harvest deer in these 25 counties during opening weekend must present their harvested deer at one of the Department’s 56 CWD sampling stations so staff can collect tissue samples to test the animals for CWD. You can find a list of sampling stations at www.mdc.mo.gov/cwd, or in the 2017 Fall Deer and Turkey Hunting Regulations booklet, which is available wherever hunting permits are sold.
In addition to the mandatory testing, MDC offers free testing for hunters who wants their deer checked for CWD. This is particularly important considering recent news about the susceptibility of some monkeys to the brain-wasting disease.
In a study led by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, macaques that were fed venison from CWD-infected deer developed the disease. The researchers noted that there still is no known case of CWD affecting humans. However, the apparent susceptibility of physiologically similar primates led them to conclude that, “the most prudent approach is to consider that CWD has the potential to infect humans.”
I am not an alarmist person by nature, and I am not going to let the small risk of shooting a CWD infected deer or the equally small risk of contracting CWD from eating infected meat, deprive me of a sport that I love and the pleasure of eating venison. However, with free testing available, I certainly will take every deer I kill to one of the eight MDC offices and 55 taxidermists around the state who are participating in the voluntary CWD sampling program. I put venison in the freezer, labeled with the date I shot the deer, and wait for test results before consuming it. That just seems sensible to me.
I also do what I can to avoid spreading CWD. For years, I put corn around my trail cameras to get better deer pictures. I stopped several years ago, when it became clear that anything that unnaturally concentrates deer and increases the potential for CWD transmission. I stopped putting out salt licks and mineral blocks for the same reason. The prions that cause CWD are shed in deer urine, so I also have stopped using urine-based deer lures.

Baiting the area around trail cameras brings deer up close, but it also increases the likelihood of disease transmission.  Jim Low Photo

After field-dressing deer, I usually take them home and process them myself. In the past, I got rid of carcass by putting them in the woods behind our house and letting scavengers dispose of them. No more. Now I put them in heavy trash bags and send them to the landfill, just in case they had CWD. If you take your deer to a commercial processor, you’re covered. In Missouri, they are required to send all their carcasses to approved landfills.
MDC’s regulation guide has more ideas for reducing the spread of CWD, along with tips for making the sampling process quicker and easier.
-end-

Poached Venison Burgers – so simple, so delicious

We all look for better ways to share in the bounty of fat-free deer meat found on our lands across this great country, here is one easy recipe that will make old, new or tough deer meat, as tasty as can be.  Joe Forma photo

By Fern Fisher

Many of my outdoor guide friends in the mid-west and northeast use this recipe, or a recipe quite similar to this one, to share in the bounty of fat-free deer meat found and harvested on our lands across this great country.  It’s easy, tasty and healthy.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound ground venison
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup seasoned bread crumbs, adjust with addition of water to mix for proper burger forming consistency
  • 1/4 -1/2 cup finely chopped sweet onion
  • 2 tbsp. minced garlic
  • ¼ cup tomato ketchup
  • 3-4 tsp Olive oil for coating alum foil
  • 1 can Campbell’s mushroom soup
  • 1 large fresh Portabella mushroom
  • 1 fresh sweet pepper, color of your choice
  • Salt, Pepper, ground Chives

Mixing ingredients: Add the beaten egg, garlic, sweet onion, ketchup, a ½ tsp of salt and ½ tsp of black pepper to the ground venison.  Add enough water to make the mix pliable, the ingredients will combine to a delicious flavor.  Add enough Italian bread crumps to keep mixture from becoming too watery.  Form about 4-5 burger patties by hand that are about 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick.

Poaching – Can use Grill or Oven: Cut some aluminum foil large enough to fold around two burgers so a seam can be made on the top for two burger patties. Coat the area where the burgers will be placed with a few drops of olive oil.  Place the burgers.  Add one full tablespoon of undiluted Campbell’s mushroom soup to the top of each burger. Top with slices of Portabella mushroom, top with thin slices of sweet onion and thin slices of red, yellow or green pepper.  Then close up the aluminum foil making it a bag-like compartment, making the foil almost airtight.  Before closing completely, place 3-4 Tbsp. of water inside the folded foil with the burger (for steam).

Place the foiled burger in a 325 degree oven for 15 minutes, or on a grill (low) for 20-25 minutes.  The goal is for a finished burger that is done, but not over-done.  Remove from heat just when the water you added has been boiling for 2-3 minutes (you can hear it if you’re on the grill).

The foil keeps all the moisture in and allows the meat to cook in its own juices.  It’s a mini-pressure cooker!  This is easy and if you prepare ahead of time, you can cook 30 – 40 burgers for a small army of visitors all at once.

Add a slice of fresh sweet onion, a fresh leaf of lettuce, a fresh slice of tomato and your favorite topping condiments.  My family simply enjoys the flavor without any additional toppings.  Another option, of course, is to add a slice of your favorite cheese.

Of course, all of this on a hard roll of your choice, unless you’re watching the carbs.

So good, bet you can’t eat just one, enjoy!

 

Yummy Venison Nacho’s for Super Bowl Sunday

venison_nachosThis is a great time to relish the satisfaction of delicious meals that can result from the success of MSG-free sportsmen pursuits of hunting wild game and fishing.

There is something very special about the culinary delights that connect us to conservation practices, the purity of organic food from wild harvest, and the reality of incredible taste from this healthy food source.

venisonnachos_ingredientsGreat tasting healthy food helps to justify the cost of the license and gear, and all the time we spend learning about how to be successful.

A few years ago, my family started looking around for proven recipes that would provide even more range on how we prepare the wild bounty from our lands and lakes around us.  We discovered the “Wild Harvest Table” from Cornell Cooperative Extension nutrition educator, Moira M. Tidball, a culinary aficionado who enjoys cooking all kinds of wild game and offers free, proven, advice.  The result has been delicious and nutritious!

For this Super Bowl weekend, we are preparing a crowd-pleasing recipes that has become one of our favorites: venison nachos.  They are awesome!  Let me share with you that there is never any leftovers from either recipe.

For the venison nachos, health consumers today all appreciate that using the venison instead of beef lowers the fat content of typical nacho recipes, that’s all good.  This recipe is quite simple.

In a stock pot, add one tablespoon of olive oil and brown the venison over medium-high heat.  Add one medium to large chopped white sweet onion and cook 3-5 minutes more until the onion is translucent.  Add 2-3 cloves of minced garlic and 2-3 tablespoons of chili powder, cook another minute (don’t let the garlic get brown). At this point, adding one teaspoon of oregano and one teaspoon of cumin is optional, if you like those flavors (I do).  Then add one tablespoon of brown sugar and one 28-ounce can of diced tomatoes (or one quart of home canned tomatoes) and gently stir the entire mix in the pan.

Bring the mixture to a gentle boil, once there, lower the heat and simmer the chili about half an hour until it thickens and starts to smell “so good!”  Then add one 15-ounce can of red kidney beans or black beans, your choice, but drain and rinse before adding.  Then cook 20 minutes or so until heated through and the consistency is thick.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.

We then pour the mix into a wide baking dish, sprinkle one cup of shredded cheddar cheese over the top and place it in the oven preheated to 400 degrees.  Heat some tortilla chips in the oven at the same time.  Remove when the cheese melts (about 6 minutes or so).  Spoon some of the mix right into the warmed tortillas, add some sour cream topping and dig in!

Nutritionally, a one cup serving is about 360 calories, offers 25 percent of daily adult needs for Vitamin A and Calcium, 30 percent for Vitamin C and 20 percent for iron, with 24 grams of protein!

This recipe makes six to eight one-cup servings.

Simple and Delicious Venison Steak

venison_steak

Simple and Delicious Venison Steak
Easy and Fun from Freezer to Dinner Plate

venisonsteak_ingredientsThis simple venison steak recipe we mostly use for the backyard grill, but it can also be easily cooked in the broiler of your kitchen stove, on a griddle-plate or in the colas of a wilderness hunt campfire a hundred miles from civilization.  It’s easy and delicious!

First, trim your steaks of any obvious fat as venison fat is not sweet, it is tart when cooked.  On both sides of the steak(s), rub in a dash of salt, pepper and any of your own personal favorite garden herbs.   Then, on a sheet of heavy aluminum foil large enough to allow fold-over and enclosure of the steak in the middle, spread a drop or two of olive oil on the bottom where the steaks will be placed.

Position the steak(s) in the center of the foil (can place two small steaks side by side), smear the top of the steak with a tablespoon or two of Campbell’s mushroom soup, right from the can.  Carefully place a semi-thick slice of sweet onion on top of that, add a thinly sliced collection of red or yellow peppers atop the onion, drop in a quarter teaspoon (or so) of minced garlic and carefully start to fold the aluminum foil around the steaks to form a sort of sealed envelope package, being extra careful to leave a small opening on one top end.

In this opening, add four to five tablespoons of water.  Now close-up that foil opening nice and tight, place on a medium heat grill (300F) or in an oven for 15 minutes.

The foil envelope forms a sort of mini-pressure cooker.  Once cooked, you’ll be able to hear the water boiling, be very careful when you open the foil.  The steam is super-heated and looking for a quick escape, so use your oven gloves.  If you don’t have steam exiting, you may have cooked it too long or did not add enough water, remember that for next time.

Remove the steak from the foil wrapper and to your plate to serve with the other preparations you wish to eat.  We like whole sweet potatoes, green beans or carrots and a small salad with a glass of red wine.

The steak is so tender it will literally fall apart.  You can add your favorite steak sauce if you like, but most of my family simply eats right out of the wrapper from the grill.

So simple, so delicious, so good for you.